Historical Climate Modelling

Through remote sensing and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) we are able to monitor many of the factors associated with climate change, therefore providing the information farmers need to decide when to plant or what types of crops they should be investing in.

Climate has a direct link on crop yield, growing seasons and crop and therefore it is critical to monitor variations in climate variables. Farmers in developing countries are reliant on their crops for a source of income, and if the growing season is shorter or if there is less rain it could have devastating effect on them and their family.

Through remote sensing and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) we are able to monitor many of the factors associated with climate change, therefore providing the information farmers need to decide when to plant or what types of crops they should be investing in.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor receives data from the entire surface of the Earth every 2 days, allowing consistent monitoring of the Earth at country-wide or regional scales. Data available includes: Surface temperature, sea surface temperature, Snow and ice cover, water vapour, chlorophyll concentration, and rainfall.

Surface temperature is one of the major influences on global growth patterns. Surface temperature determines what type of vegetation can be sustained, but conversely the vegetation influences how hot the surface can become.

Where vegetation is dense the land surface will not rise above 35 degree Celsius. Developing areas, such as the Horn of Africa, rely heavily on vegetation in the form of crops, so better understanding of these data relationships can allow for decisions to be made.